Spice Jar Organization with Free Printable Labels

spice-jar-organizationI’ve been meaning to post about the quick facelift that I gave to our spice jars for a while now…and hooray, today I’m finally doing it! I feel like I should first start out by saying that I don’t see anything wrong with anyone leaving everything in the original bottles. I’m not typically such an organized person, but because of the extremely limited storage space in our kitchen, I knew that I needed to streamline the hodgepodge of containers that were filling the space if I planned to hold anything else besides spices inside them. Plus, after painting the interiors I couldn’t really stand the thought of putting the old jumble of jars back inside.

spice-organization-beforeHere’s what I was working with. Not my fave.

spice-jar-organization-3And here they are now! The project turned out to be surprisingly simple! I picked up some glass spice jars and clamp-lid jars from World Market (I have to admit that it was a bit painful shelling out money for empty bottles), made up some simple spice identification labels to print onto adhesive paper, filled the new bottles up, and stuck each label on. Tada!

I have to say that the results really have made a world of difference for the functionality of my kitchen! I actually enjoy looking inside my less cluttered cupboards while cooking now, and everything is as easy to find as it is pretty to look at.

spice-jar-organization-5If this project sounds like something up your alley and you want to get a jump-start on things, I’ve made the printable spice labels that I used available as a freebie through the link below. Please note that they are not sized to fit a specific label template (I was too tired to try to figure that out when I was initially creating them for my project), so I just printed them onto full sheets of adhesive label paper, and used a circle craft punch to cut out the labels for the small spice jars.

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Of course you might have a different assortment of spices in your kitchen than the ones I included on these labels. If so, you can use the free font Miso (the one I used for my labels) to create any additional labels that you need.

spice-jar-organization-4Juni gives this project two paws up!

Tried + True: Caramelized Peaches + Cream with Toasted Crumble

caramelized-peaches-cream-crumbleI spotted this Caramelized Peaches + Cream with Toasted Crumble recipe over on Pinterest last week and immediately knew that it was going to become my next test project/recipe for the newly-minted Tried + True series.

caramelized-peaches-cream-crumble3Happily, the recipe was a huge success (I’ve actually made it twice now), so I get to share the results with you here today! Woot woot! The caramelized sauce paired with the fresh sweetness of the fruit, topped off with the crunch of topping is pure nirvana. I have a feeling this gem of a recipe is going to continue to be a Summertime regular in my home from here on out. And I know it’s dessert and all, but I’ve also enjoyed eating the leftover chilled fruit for breakfast…with yogurt (that makes it healthy right?).

caramelized-peaches-cream-crumble2Needless to say, I’m urging you to skedaddle on over to check out How Sweet Eats for the original Caramelized Peaches + Cream with Toasted Crumble Recipe pronto. You will not be sorry!

Here are few notes from my experience:

  • Instead of the coconut cream, I whipped up some heavy whipping cream with a bit of granulated white sugar, and a splash of bourbon vanilla, for a delicious addition.
  • I also added a dash of bourbon vanilla to the peaches during the carmelization phase. Yum!
  • Because the caramelized peaches are very sweet (both from their natural sweetness and the brown sugar), I recommend not over-sweetening the cream.
  • Bonus…if you make sure to use gluten-free oats and gluten-free vanilla, this recipe is deliciously gluten-free

caramelized-peaches-cream-crumble1All photos taken with iPhone 5c

3 DIY Projects for Setting a Colorful Tabletop

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Friday is upon us! Can I get a big hooray! While I’ve got a mountain of to-dos to tackle over the weekend (who doesn’t really), I will probably practice the fine art of procrastination and put those off until the last minute so that I can try out a few DIY projects I’ve been eyeing from around the web. Can you blame me?! These three are top contenders:

DIY Color-Dipped Bottles from Oh So Beautiful Paper  //  DIY Colorblock Food Domes from Sugar & Cloth  //  DIY Pom Pom Placemats from Rue Daily

Have a colorful weekend friends! xo Ez

Tried + True: DIY Air-Dry Clay

tried-and-true-diy-air-dry-clayHi friends! Today I’m kicking off a new mini series called Tried + True! I figured that since I try my hand at so many of the craft projects that I find via Pinterest, that it only makes sense to share the results of some of the really good ones with you. Tried and true!

tried-and-true-diy-air-dry-clay-1The first project up is this DIY Air-Dry Clay from Full of Great Ideas (via). You know I love a good air-dry clay project or two, but the cost of store-bought clay can be a bit of a buzz kill when you’ve got a great idea brewing and only a few pennies in the bank. As luck will have it, you only need three simple pantry ingredients to whip up a batch of this clay…which means no trips to the craft store (another bonus)!

tried-and-true-diy-air-dry-clay-2I followed the full recipe and directions found on Full of Great Ideas’ post. Mid-way through the cooking/stirring process I started to think that I might have a big Pinterest fail on my hands…but luckily I just kept at it, and suddenly a few mixes around the pot later I had a clumpy bit of clay!

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I decided to allow my clay shapes to air dry (they are drying in my kitchen right now) and they are looking great so far. If you want to bake them, be sure to read through Full of Great Ideas’ original post…she walks through both the air-drying and baking methods.

Here are few notes from my experience:

  • While cooking, it takes quite a lot of stirring and elbow-grease to get the clay mixed up once it begins to thicken. Because of this, I don’t recommend having young children help during the cooking stage.
  • Be sure to allow clay to cool enough before use.
  • This clay is also very drying for your skin. If little kids will be working with the clay, be sure to help them wash their hands as soon as they are finished, so as to avoid irritating their sensitive skin.
  • Keep extra clay stored in an airtight container.
  • Have fun!

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All photos taken with iPhone 5c

Quick DIY: Festive Tassel Napkin Ties + Gift Toppers

diy-tassel-napkin-ties-1I didn’t originally plan for this post to fit in with the 4th of July holiday, but it ended suiting the day really well, so here you have it! Of course I hope you won’t feel limited to using this tutorial for just one occasion. These quick and easy DIY Tassel Napkin Ties and Gift Toppers can be color-customized to suit any decor or holiday…and they take only minutes to make! I hope you’ll enjoy creating them as much as I did!

DIY Tassel Napkin Ties

diy-tassel-napkin-ties-flossYou will need:

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Start by wrapping your first embroidery floss color around the four fingers on your non-dominant hand. Wrap the thread snuggly as you wind around your hand, but not so tight that it pulls your fingers on top of one another. For these tassels here I wrapped the floss around my hand 40 times. Snip the end and carefully remove the thread bundle from your hand. Repeat with your second color.

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Carefully snip each thread bundle at the bottom and drape them over your thumb side by side. Gently straighten out any overlapping threads. It’s okay if the bottom ends are a tad uneven at this point.

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Place your two thread bundles atop a long length of contrasting embroidery floss, leaving a long thread tail of 6-inches or more on one side. TIP: At this stage, I prefer to use the entire spool of contrasting floss instead of cutting it, so that I make sure to have enough for wrapping. Tie a very tight double-knot around the top 1/3 of your thread bundle. Do not cut your thread yet!

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Begin to tightly wrap the long end of your contrasting thread around your thread bundles, starting where you tied your double-knot, and working your way upward. Make sure that the 6-inch thread tail remains uncovered. Wrap as far up the tassel as you’d like and then wrap back down until you reach your original starting place. Double-knot the loose end (the one you just used for wrapping) with the 6-inch tail you left in the previous steps. Cut the loose thread so that it is the same length as your thread tail (you should now have two long tails of contrasting thread). Trim off any uneven threads from the bottom of your tassel.

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Woohoo! You just made your first tassel!!

diy-tassel-napkin-ties-finishedNow if you want to jazz your tassels up with some glittered stars you will need:

  • Heavy-weight paper / card stock
  • Star template (optional) | you can also cut them freehand like I did here
  • Scissors
  • Elmer’s or craft glue
  • Small paintbrush
  • Fine glitter(s)
  • Mini hole punch (optional) OR pushpin
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Cut stars from heavy-weight paper (or download my printable star template). Work on top of a piece of scrap paper and use a paintbrush to coat one side of each star with craft glue. Generously sprinkle glued surface with glitter and let dry. Punch a hole in each star using a mini hole punch or poke a hole with a pushpin.

Thread stars onto your tassels, tie a knot to hold them in place, and you’re done! Tie finished tassels around rolled napkins for a festive table setting…

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…Or use them to top gifts! Enjoy! xo Ez

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